Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - George

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 11
31
Dog foods / Re: Nutriment
« on: Jan 15, 2015, 09:34 »
Nutriment are bringing out 6 new varieties in their 'Dinner for Dogs'  range later this month, and all will be sold in smaller 200g trays.  ;D

They say this range is ideal for small dogs. It is lower meat content than the original Working Dog Nutriment, at 75%, but that is still higher than any of the Natures Menu foods. It also lacks the 'superfood' ingredients, which some approve of but others don't.

You can see the range here: http://www.nutriment.co/dinner-for-dogs-range/

32
Introductions / Re: Nutriment Newbie
« on: Jan 15, 2015, 09:33 »
Nutriment are bringing out 6 new varieties in their 'Dinner for Dogs'  range later this month, and all will be sold in smaller 200g trays.  ;D

They say this range is ideal for small dogs. It is lower meat content than the original Working Dog Nutriment, at 75%, but that is still higher than any of the Natures Menu foods. It also lacks the 'superfood' ingredients, which some approve of but others don't.

You can see the range here: http://www.nutriment.co/dinner-for-dogs-range/

I'll copy this post to the Nutriment thread, so it can be found for future reference.

33
General dog chat / Re: Cross breed snobbery...
« on: Jan 14, 2015, 16:50 »
  It just goes to show how people really want these dogs as opposed to pure bred ones.  It's a mystery to me why this is so.

Because they are fashionable Dottie, all other reasons are excuses. Even the man who created the first of these so-called 'breeds', the 'labradoodle', now says he unleashed a monster and that he greatly regrets it.

34
General dog chat / Re: Cross breed snobbery...
« on: Jan 14, 2015, 12:03 »
I agree with everything Dottie says.

I would also like to add that I have known considerable prejudice, if not snobbery, against pedigree dogs from the owners of fashionable cross breeds with portmanteau 'names'. These people appear to believe that all pedigree dogs are inherently unhealthy and that cross breeds, by virtue of what they refer to as hybrid vigour, are automatically healthier. This is, of course complete nonsense, for the reasons Dottie refers to above, but such people frequently and rudely sneer at pedigree dogs, to or in the hearing of their owners.

I have twice been asked by people I met on a walk whether I would be willing to mate The Little Cav to their pet bitches, one a poodle and the other of indeterminate breeding (I didn't ask!), in one case it was implied that the result would be healthier pups and in the other case it was actually said in no uncertain terms. My replies would be modded if I told you what they were. I have no intention of breeding him, but if  ever did it would be to a health tested Cavalier bitch and he himself would be health tested first.

35
Yes George, any dog could be intolerant to one or more ingredients in any food. I assumed, maybe wrongly, that the tests at the vets that were normal included intolerance tests.

From what David said (here: http://www.allaboutdogfood.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=691.msg1047#msg1047) about the accuracy, or more correctly inaccuracy, of intolerance tests, it wouldn't make much difference if tests had been done.

I find it quite shocking, to be honest, that vets are taking money for tests that are at best 25% accurate, and then allowing their clients to rely on the results - or I would find it shocking, if anything vets do had the power to shock me any longer.

36
David G, when I was struggling with The Little Cav I tried doing exactly as you suggest. In fact, being fully aware of the dangers of overfeeding, I tied it more than once, with the same result each time - while the volume of his poos reduced (obvously, really) the quality and frequency of them was no different, and he lost even more weight, which he could ill afford.

The only way I could keep him from becoming positively skeletal before I switched him to raw was to feed massively more than guideline amounts, just as JIB has found to be necessary.

I guess that while overfeeding does cause the food to pass through too quickly, as you say, so feeding a diet that really does not suit the individual dog for whatever reason can do exactly the same.

37
With the premade raw do you have to rotate the protein sources like with proper raw or is it more of a complete diet, making that unnecessary? I only ask because my dogs only 8kgs so it makes it a bit harder to rotate without some of the stuff I've defrosted going bad before I use it up.

You don't have to use more than one protein source, and some highly intolerant dogs might only have one they can tolerate I suppose, but it is better if you do - it doesn't have to be one meal at a time though, it's fine to finish one tub before starting another, different one. My own little boy is just 6.5 kg, and each 500g tub lasts him 3 days before we start on the next one. You might want to start with just one variety anyway, the salmon for example, and later introduce others one at a time. Their helplines will advise you.

Also is it ok to not feed any bones on the pre-made. I know a proper raw diet would probably be best for her but I don't really like the idea of raw food on my floors but the premade I can just serve in her bowl

It's absolutely fine not to feed bones if you don't wish to, ground bone is included anyway, though bones are good for keeping teeth clean. I don't feed bones myself, the Little Cav loves deer antlers and has those instead.

38
And a belated Happy New Year to all from me too, along with my own thanks to David, Dottie & Tinyplanets for all the work and time you put in. Hopefully many more dogs will benefit from a healthier diet in the year ahead.

39
Hi JIB,

She has frequent on-off soft poos, but even when she has good poos she has always gone around 4 times a day which seems a lot for a high quality food.

I had problems very like this with my little boy for a long time (though he also had other signs of intolerance such as gunky eyes & ears). He was the same on every dry food I tried, all very highly rated, and the only thing I've found that has settled him is grain-free raw food - he was a little better on Natures Menu raw with rice but only completely cured when I switched him to Nutriment. He's now doing well on a mixture of Nutriment and Natural Instinct and they seem to suit him equally.

With both of these you also have the ability to include variety by trying just one or two protein sources at a time, and so identify any that do not suit your dog.

As you say, raw complete does work out a very reasonable cost compared to high quality dry, and I'd back up Dottie's suggestion to give Nutriment or Natural Instinct a call and discuss it with them; both are very helpful in my experience.

40
Introductions / Re: Deerhound Greyhound cross called Fred
« on: Dec 20, 2014, 17:41 »
My plan now is to continue with the canin for a few weeks to let his system settle and put a little weight back on (he lost about 1/2 a kg) and then try a new food without beef, rice or grain.

That sounds a good plan to me, and I'm glad you have him back on an even keel.

I do have a question about what i can leave him with as a chew as a raw hide / cow ear replacement.  Are fish skins as tough?

The fish skins are crunchy and, as Dottie says, great for helping keep teeth clean, but are not a long lasting chew like hides & ears. It is possible to get non beef alternatives though - My Itchy Dog do venison and lamb ears and venison hide chews, all of which he'd probably be fine with - I believe venison is usually considered a good bet for dogs with intolerances. See : http://www.myitchydog.co.uk/super-healthy-dog-treats/page/1/

41
Introductions / Re: Deerhound Greyhound cross called Fred
« on: Dec 18, 2014, 20:18 »
I thought the high protein might have the opposite effect and make his stool looser

It certainly would do that if you feed too much of it, and the amount he needs could be less than the feeding guidelines (I would suggest starting him on a low amount, say 80% of guideline amounts, and keeping an eye on his condition then adjusting accordingly), but as long as he's not being overfed that shouldn't be an issue.

Alternatively, if you feel happier with a slightly lower protein level, you could look at Acana Regionals in the Pacifica variety - this is also exclusively fish proteins and is also grain free, but lower in protein at 33%.

42
Introductions / Re: Deerhound Greyhound cross called Fred
« on: Dec 18, 2014, 19:26 »
I'm in agreement with David Green here, in that if you want to stick with a dry food then a cereal free, fish based kibble would be a good bet - fish is  easily digested by most dogs, and the Eden he mentions does sound very suitable. The idea of switching to a bland home cooked diet for a short while first to help him settle sounds good to me too.

The high protein content worries me though.  It is very different from anything he has had before which have all been around the 20 % mark.

I don't think that's anything to be concerned about at all.

43
Dog treats / Re: Do you feed treats to your dog?
« on: Dec 16, 2014, 17:15 »
The Little Cav has some new treats, and he thinks he's gone to treat heaven. They are...

Cat treats! I intended to buy some more of the Thrive Kind & Gentle 100% chicken treats, and almost bought the cat version by mistake - they look almost identical. Then I noticed that Thrive actually do more varieties of the cat treats than they do of the Kind & Gentle, and one of them is 100% tuna. The Little Cav adores tuna so I bought some of those instead; they're a little bit smelly but not too much so and he simply loves them.

44
Supplements / Re: Probiotics and prebiotics ?
« on: Dec 11, 2014, 11:41 »
I don't feed probiotics all the time, I've never felt that a healthy dog on a good diet has any need of that, but I do always have some in the cupboard and add them to the diet when they are needed - I think they are beneficial whenever the dog has a digestive upset or diarrhoea (such as after picking up & eating something nasty on a walk), after antibiotic treatment (since antibiotics kill good as well as bad bacteria), and at times of emotional stress (I believe that can also upset gut bacteria).

When I do give probiotics I choose one that includes prebiotics in the formulation; they are more expensive but since I don't use them all the time I'm not too worried about that. The one I have in stock at the moment is Yumpro.

A rescue dog such as those you mention would be another matter of course, possibly needing long-term help, and I'm afraid I really don't know how that should be approached. Hopefully someone else will know more.

45
I did the same experiment George and was impressed how well the Gentle broke up.

It is very impressive, isn't it? In fact I'm impressed by cold pressed foods, full stop. If ever I had to give up feeding raw I'm pretty sure that's the way I'd go.

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 11