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Messages - shingigz

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1
General discussion / Re: Has your vet been brainwashed?
« on: Sep 08, 2020, 22:02 »
Yes, vets are brainwashed,  Everybody is brainwashed in this upside-down corrupt world system.

“Everything is backwards; everything is upside down. Doctors destroy health, lawyers destroy justice, universities destroy knowledge, governments destroy freedom, the major media destroy information, and religions destroy spirituality.” – Michael Ellner

My little dog AND cat would surely be on rubbish Royal Canin after me spending hundreds of pounds and stressful days at the vets had I not had the instinct and determination to go against the grain and find out myself what was crippling their digestive systems and find them suitable good foods.

2
It's interesting, because although my dog is affected very negatively by carrageenan, my cat appears to be okay with it. BUT, after 14 months of intermittent chronic diarrhoea, and me keeping a detailed 'food and symptom' diary for her, I know she is affected by one or more of the other gums / thickening agents / binders / emulsifiers, and I am very close to being able to pinpoint which one. 

I'm pestering a company at the moment which is refusing to tell me which thickeners it uses in some foods I listed, due to the company wanting to keep its recipes confidential.  I'm so desperate to find out, I even emailed the CEO of the PFMA for help.  If and when I find out what they use, I believe I will have the answer to what gives her diarrhoea.

I always think about the very many animals with food intolerances, where people tend to think that it must be chicken or rice allergy, or some other main ingredient.  They wouldn't automatically think it could be something that is not even on the label!  And I've read hundreds of posts over the last year from people who have taken their poorly pets to the vets for test after test after test, the results of which were always 'negative'.

Companies should have to declare thickeners on their labels!  Why are they hiding these inflammatory ingredients that are NOT insignificant and can cause so much upset, i.e.: carrageenan, locust bean gum, guar gum, cassia gum, xanthan gum, agar agar and carob, which I think may be the same thing as locust bean gum?

Virtually all cat and dog foods contain one or more of the above ingredients.  My cat is costing me a fortune in 'Meowing Heads' at the moment!  It's one of only two wet cat-foods that I have had it confirmed on two occasions that it contains NO thickeners at all.  I will be trying her on the other one, 'GranataPet', in the New Year.

For anyone who may be wondering, 'Barking Heads' wet dog-food also contains NO thickeners at all.

3
The Wolf Tucker website states that: "You should never defrost frozen meat products at room temperature as this encourages bacteria growth." And it later reaffirms: "Remember, you should never defrost raw meat at room temperature."

The Natures Menu website states that: "Our nuggets ... may take up to 2 hours at room temperature to defrost." 

The latter assumes that they are taken straight from the freezer though, as opposed to being placed in the fridge for several hours first.  I guess that the time of year and warmth of surroundings is critical, and that you should always err on the side of caution. 

I feed straight from the fridge in Spring, summer and autumn.  The shivering is a very recent occurrence which tells me the food is just too cold for his stomach at the moment and hasn't defrosted enough.

Having thought about it, I will leave his food out of the fridge in the winter months only for one hour max, and add a little hot water to any nuggets that still have ice crystals.

4
The only vegetables I cook regularly are broccoli and cauliflower, but they would not be warm by the time I gave him his dinner.  A few weeks ago, I added a floret of broccoli (unsalted) to his dinner and he vomited heavily the following morning (and I stood in it!), so it put me off doing this.  He loves to eat a small piece of uncooked broccoli or cauliflower every time I prepare it though which is four times a week.

My home is never hot in the winter, so I hope that two hours max outside the fridge (in winter) is not too long for food that has only been inside the fridge for 8 hours from frozen...  I don't think I can put hot water on some of the nuggets as they go extremely soft anyway when thawing/thawed, but for the venison nuggets which remain firmer and icy, I will try adding a dash to experiment.

5
Thanks.  I think the raw is better for him - just don't want him to have a cold tum - but I always appreciate suggestions and I would prefer him to have something warm to eat, ideally. 

Tonight I took his raw out of the fridge for two hours, and there has been no shivering.  It was the duck variety, which thaws quicker than some.  I reckon two hours is the equivalent of half an hour or so in the summer, in which case I may not need to worry about leaving it out for two hours in the winter months.   

6
I am wary of leaving raw, defrosted, or mostly-defrosted, food outside of the fridge for more than an hour due to bacteria multiplying, and I keep my home cooler than most people seem to so the food will not get warm enough to prevent him from shivering.  He's so tiny and, though long-haired, his stomach is relatively hairless, so he does soon feel the cold.

I'll try adding small amount of hot water to soften and warm the nuggets that retain ice crystals.  Maybe I could get away with leaving those out for two hours at this time of the year...  I'll try doing that first.  If this doesn't work I'll go back to wet for the winter and do what I do with his refrigerated wet-food breakfast on cold mornings, which is microwave it for 10 seconds on 40% power.  This works better than leaving the wet food out for an hour as then he can smell it while he is hungry, which frustrates him.

7
My 6 lb chihuahua has wet food in the morning, and Natures Menu raw nuggets in the evening.  I defrost the raw nuggets in the morning by putting them in the fridge until his dinner at 7 pm.  I take them out of the fridge for an hour before serving, but they are still over-cold.  Some of the varieties are still a little icy after the hour, and some are mushy, but he scoffs them all up and enjoys them all.  He shivers for a while after the food hits his stomach.  I feel mean.  Does anyone have the same problem at this time of year?  I'm thinking of going back to all-wet until the spring.

8
Introductions / Re: Me & my Yorkie
« on: Nov 19, 2019, 09:17 »
My 6lb dog has also had terrible inflammatory digestion symptoms in the past, and the culprit was carrageenan, a thickening agent used in many wet foods, so it is not always the main protein/meat content of a food which causes the upset.

I know your dog prefers dry foods, but my dog has Natures Menu raw nuggets for his evening meal every day, and they come in several varieties, including duck, rabbit, venison, all of which may be novel proteins to your one-year-old dog.  I take four nuggets from the freezer and put them in the fridge where they defrost by the evening.  He has 'wet' food for breakfast.

I strongly suggest keeping a 'food and symptom' diary, noting everything he eats, all the ingredients, and all the reactions he has.

Also, my dog became much more interested in food at 18 months old than when he was 12 months old, and he eats almost anything compared with when he was younger and raised on dry, so your dog may change his preferences over time.  He could be anorexic because he connects eating with discomfort and vomiting.  I sometimes wonder if some animals know when a food is 'not right' for them, at least I have reason to believe this is possible from my dog and cat, but it's just a theory. 

I would give him one food only (no treats or scraps) for a few days to monitor his reaction, otherwise the result will be inconclusive.

9
General pet chat / Re: Dog and Cat food brands
« on: Oct 14, 2019, 21:41 »
Barking Heads and Meowing Heads also are good - no thickening agents are used.  Also agree with Natures Menu, but I don't have much experience with many others.  Sainsbury's Delicious is a good-priced decent cat food, and they also do a dog food in this range, though I haven't bought it.

10
Quote from: shingigz on May 01, 2019, 09:39
"Thanks to the recent upsurge in interest on the matter [carrageenan], Forthglade are now trialling alternative stabilisers so I'd say that's a great result."


It's good to hear this, and it will be a great result if they actually carry through with it.  If thickeners aren't labelled, I will still have to ask the company to check if it contains carrageenan before I give it to my dog.  I have let Lily's Kitchen know about this.  Hopefully they will be feeling the heat, too.
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<


Just to add I've received this back from Lily's:

>>>"Carrageenan is a natural polysaccharide that is extracted from seaweed. It is widely used in the food industry, for its gelling, thickening, and stabilising properties. It is also commonly used as a vegetarian or vegan alternative to gelatin.
 
While anything could be harmful in excess, we only use a very small amount of undegraded carrageenan in our food.
 
Carrageenan is common in many pet and human foods, though it is not a legal requirement that it is declared. However, we like to be as transparent as possible which is why we include it on our label.
 
We work closely with experts and vets to create all of our recipes, and without the inclusion of carrageenan, our wet food would have a watery consistency, due to the natural moisture content of the ingredients we use. All of our food is made in accordance with the guidelines set out by FEDIAF and the appropriate laws governing the European pet food industry. "<<<

They also said they would pass on my feedback (namely, that I do not wish to feed my dog carrageenan or any other similar 'thickener') to the relevant team.

I had the same reply from them early in March 2019, word-for-word (below).  So they must be used to customers  asking them about their use of carrageenan.

"Carrageenan is a natural polysaccharide that is extracted from seaweed. It is widely used in the food industry, for its gelling, thickening, and stabilising properties. It is also commonly used as a vegetarian or vegan alternative to gelatin.
 
While anything could be harmful in excess, we only use a very small amount of undegraded carrageenan in our food.
 
Carrageenan is common in many pet and human foods, though it is not a legal requirement that it is declared. However, we like to be as transparent as possible which is why we include it on our label.
 
We work closely with experts and vets to create all of our recipes, and without the inclusion of carrageenan, our wet food would have a watery consistency, due to the natural moisture content of the ingredients we use. All of our food is made in accordance with the guidelines set out by FEDIAF and the appropriate laws governing the European pet food industry."

11
Dog foods / Re: New here! Advice please
« on: Jun 10, 2019, 22:20 »
I have been through an elimination diet with both my chihuahua (bad digestive trouble) and my cat (chronic diarrhoea), and found the culprit for both in the end.

I would suggest you try one food with a good percentage score on the Dog Food Directory.  If he has a reaction (and even if he doesn't), write down and keep a list of all the ingredients in this food.  I would stick with one food only, and give no treats or extras.  He probably won't get bored of a good food that he enjoys.  If you give one food only for a while without treats or extras, you will be certain that nothing else is in the equation.

You can introduce a different food later and do the same steps.  Eventually you will have lists of ingredients to compare and if he itches on some of them, you may see a common link in the ingredients of the foods that caused the itching.

If you find a food that agrees with him, there would be no rush or real need or concern to introduce something new, quickly.

He seems to have an allergy, so you will need to keep lists and notes to help you out in the future.

12
General discussion / Re: NEW RATING ALGORITHM... finally!
« on: Jun 09, 2019, 09:33 »
I sometimes feed my nearly-3-year-old 2.75 kg dog Barking Heads wet food pouches.  If he has this exclusively, he has less than half of a 300 g pouch per day, it costs me around 80p per day .  The directory calculates that it would cost £2.50 per day.

I like this dog food as it doesn't contain any thickeners at all, and I wouldn't want people put off it thinking it is more expensive to feed than it is.

Having said this, I am yet to find a 300 g pouch that contains more than 260 g of actual food.  I have weighed the contents of many a dog and cat food, and the weight of the pouches themselves is included in the total, and then some.

 


13
Dog treats / Re: Healthy dental chews?
« on: May 31, 2019, 12:02 »
I buy Lily's Kitchen Woof Brushes.  I have a chihuahua.  Instead of buying a small single Woof Brush at £1.29 each, I buy the large size, and cut them into four pieces and give him one piece a day (after his tooth brushing).  The large are twice the volume of the small.

Packs of 7 are currently 'Buy One Get One Half-Price' at Pets at Home.  With this offer my dog's daily Woof Brush works out at 22p per day and they last for four weeks.

It probably wouldn't do much for a large dog though.

14
General discussion / Re: NEW RATING ALGORITHM... finally!
« on: May 29, 2019, 09:40 »
I like the percentage method of scoring.

I think this directory is becoming much more known about among dog owners.  I hear it mentioned regularly on other websites and forums.  And, I was discussing dog food with a member of staff at Pets at Home last week and she was telling me that one of the foods we were discussing has been awarded 3.8.  I asked if she was referring to the allaboutdogfood directory, and she said yes.

I have found a fairly local supplier of Nutriment, but my tiny dog only needs 100g of raw per day.  Short of investing in an electric saw to portion it out for daily use, I don't see how I can buy a block of it make it usable.  So I continue with Nature's Menu nuggets, which score well.

Thank you for all of your hard work - it is worth it!

15
Thanks, Dottie.  The softly, softly approach is working.  I managed three tiny scrapes of his upper 'canine' teeth yesterday after the brushing; two scrapes the day before.

I gave him his third chicken wing yesterday morning.  He chewed it for 10 minutes and then left it, mostly uneaten.   

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