All About Dog Food Forum

Dog food and feeding => Dog foods => Topic started by: Rexluna on Dec 15, 2016, 18:07

Title: Anal glands and bone in feed
Post by: Rexluna on Dec 15, 2016, 18:07
Hi, my hound has always had a problem with blocked anal glands. However, I've noticed that whenever she has a lot of bone added to her diet, even when her food is 50% porridge and the rest is pressure cooked turkey meat and the bones, the bum problem disappears.

Which dog foods have the highest bone content? And is ash the same thing?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Anal glands and bone in feed
Post by: Schnauday on Dec 15, 2016, 20:45
Sounds like changing to a raw diet would be the best option. You could then feed chicken necks, carcass etc and control the amount of bone given to keep her problem under control.
Title: Re: Anal glands and bone in feed
Post by: Dottie on Dec 16, 2016, 10:23
Hello and welcome to the forum. Are you feeding your dog home cooked food and if so, do you want to continue with this or change to something different? If it is the latter, what type of food do you want to use (dry/wet/raw)?  Your post is brief but to me the home cooked diet doesn't sound as if it is complete. 50% porridge is quite a lot and there is no mention of fruit and vegetables.

Please could you post back with more information? If you prefer not to then I would agree with Schnauday that a correctly balanced raw diet might be advantageous. Either join one of the raw feeding Facebook groups or go for one of the commercial prepared and complete products such as Natural Instinct, Nutriment, Natures Menu. These all provide the correct ratio of bone. IIRC the correct amount is 10%. You do not want to overfeed with bone - there is information on this here. (http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/bone-food-values-for-raw-feeding-dogs/)
Chicken wings/duck and chicken neck add bone but are not strictly needed if you use a complete raw diet.

Ash is not the same as bone meal - there is an explanation about ash
here. (http://www.allaboutdogfood.co.uk/dog-feeding-guide#ash) It is the mineral content of food.