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Messages - KatrinH

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1
Introductions / Re: Hello
« on: May 03, 2016, 19:06 »
I'd be interested in hearing about supplements and what they argue.

Mine is on a wet with added fresh for variety, as he has many intolerances. I try to go for variety as much as possible and only "supplement" probiotics and oils and herbs. He gets duck, turkey, salmon, occassionally eggs, potatos and sweet potatos, pumpkin, and different veggies as I have them.

2
I have read about the L-Tryptophan (spelling?) and have several people say it works. It's quite popular in Germany it seems.

If you do not like the food, I have heard that feeding protein, which naturally has Tryptophan in it, and then 1-2 hours delayed carbs, speeds up and helps with the uptake of the Tryptophan and in turn helps with serotonin and calms the dog.

I need to start a trial of that myself, but it is a bit more difficult with timing.


Otherwise I do recommend trying Bach essences too.

3
Introductions / Re: Dog allergy
« on: Apr 21, 2016, 19:36 »
Puh rabbit is a tough one. Mine can have duck, luckily, which is easier to find, although I now feed a wet food and add fresh. It may be the only option for you in the end. Is it only the meats that he reacts too?  Mine has many intolerances and I found that with any dried food I would end up getting issues because there would be stuff in it that was not supposed to be in and/or he may have been reacting to the preservatives too.

You may want to consider trying to find 100% meat tins (I feed "Hermanns", which is a German brand, not sure if they have rabbit only tins) and then add your own veggies/carbs. It is easier than homecooking as you do not have to cook any meat and the tins include bones, etc. Just need to do some calculations to try and balance it and/or feed a variety as much as possible. You can also try and find someone more experienced to help you.


4
Raw feeding / Re: Dog has gone off Raw food
« on: Mar 17, 2016, 18:39 »
If it is giardia, ask for Panacur -- Metronidazole isn't as effective. I did 5 days panacur, 8 days metro (vet says combo works better), then waited 2 weeks and repeated only the Panacur.

Only, if it is giardia -- lots of cleaning! Get Halamid online, it is the only cleaner that will actually kill giardia, even though many will try to tell you regular cleaners will do it - they won't. Boiling temperatures is the best - so treat with hot hot water or steam as much as possible (e.g. furniture, wash towels and blankets every day, etc.)


It really does sound like giardia to me, it's annoying, but treatable, so that would be good.

Let us know what you find!

5
Raw feeding / Re: Dog has gone off Raw food
« on: Mar 16, 2016, 19:44 »
I just looked at the nuggets ingredients and noted that there are no carbs in it at all. If your dog had kibble with carbs before it is no wonder she lost weight. There are also dogs that need carbs, I think mine would starve if I wouldn't give him any carbs.

6
Raw feeding / Re: Dog has gone off Raw food
« on: Mar 16, 2016, 19:38 »
It sounds very similar to what I had when mine had giardia - so I'd collect her poo over at least three days and let the vet check it.

If she is an active dog (like mine) you may want to add more carbs to her diet, or if she tolerates fat like lard or butter. You can add slowly and then more and more as she tolerates. I know people who feed raw who feed up to 25% of the diet fat.

Carbs will be good to gain weight, but if she has giardia it may worsen the problem.

And simply increase the total intake. 15-20% over recommendation is not a lot. Many recommendations are quite low and set for "average" dogs -- with your breeds and the activity level she is probably already over 15-20% over recommendation. If you want her to gain weight you will have to add much more.

So e.g. the 2 - 2,5% of body weight rule for mine would result that he would need about 400g of food a day. While he needed to gain weight I fed him 1000-1200g. That is 3x as much as the recommendation -- about 200-400g of that was carbs (as he does not tolerate fats well).
He is now ideal weight and I lowered it to 600g, but still testing if that is enough or if I need to up it to keep his weight.

This does not inlcude his daily pig ear and loads of treats (dried meats) he gets.


Just like with humans there are some dogs that are difficult to feed. I would test giardia for sure, if clear, test for intolerances, and then change diet and up the rations.



7
Raw feeding / Re: Dog has gone off Raw food
« on: Mar 16, 2016, 17:53 »
What breed is she and how much has she been eating?
Also, did you test for giardia? Even if it is negative, it may still be it as the tests are quite unreliable.

My guy lost a bunch of weight in autumn even though he did not have any diarrhea but he was also eating poo -- it turned out to be giardia.

I needed to feed 1000g a day for him to put weight on, when according to the feeding guidelines he needs 400g.
So you may need to feed A LOT to put weight on.


If it doesn't resolve I would also test for food intolerances, they are actually quite common.

8
Introductions / Re: Prescription diet recommended by vet
« on: Mar 10, 2016, 19:03 »
Vets have no idea of nutrition generally. They want you to feed the hypoallergenic because that is what they were taught to feed in such situations.

If I were you, I would go along with it for a while, and be strict too, nothing else. If the problems persists, you can tell the vet it clearly isn't due to the food and/or this food isn't helping you'll try something else. It saves you nerves and arguing and your dog won't die from being on this diet for a little while. That is how I did it, because I was sick of being told it must be the food. Once either it isn't helping you can switch. And if it is helping, stay on it while you figure out something better, e.g. through an elimination diet and/or allergy tests.


9
Introductions / Re: Prescription diet recommended by vet
« on: Mar 09, 2016, 19:09 »
I agree with the 2 other posts.

My dog was on a prescription diet for a while due to his digestion issues. I wasn't happy with it. My dog did okay on it and did put weight back on but ingredients were awful and it was super expensive.


If your vet really really says to do it, it may be worth doing it for a little while, just to get them pleased and then switch asap. That's what I did (and I was on holiday, so my pet sitter had to deal with it so I just accepted it as a short term solution).



10
Home cooking / Re: Let's talk about home cooked dog food
« on: Feb 26, 2016, 18:36 »
That sounds yummy!

I cannot feed as much of a variety due to my dog's food intolerances, but I try to add variety as well. Just bought some rosemary and am cutting tiny bits of that into his food once a day. I vary between oils too, we are currently on coconut oil.


11



I don't know if you can get it in the U.K. or something similar, but have you heard of the Honest Kitchen?  I know a lot of people who feed it (in the States) as they do not have time for Raw, or a similar product. It is really high quality and price is okay too.

If you are interested in trying another wet food. Use zooplus.co.uk and try "Herrmanns". It is a German brand, organic, and decently priced. It was the cheapest after Wainwrights for my dog (20kg) on a daily basis (if Id go by their feeding amounts which I do not as my dog struggles with not enough weight). They have great customer service (I emailed directly with the boss of the company) and zooplus has equal good service. Only thing I do not like is that they do not provide percentages of ingredients (only how much meat and how much of the other stuff e.g. 50% duck, 50% sweetpotato, squash and evening primrose oil) and they will not give it to you if you ask either. However, generally the food is such a high quality that I do not mind that much (honestly, opening the can the only thing that throws me off is the consistency, otherwise I would pretty much eat it...)


KatrinH,

Not sure who you were responding to in your last post, so just to clarify.....I started the thread merely to encourage discussion on air dried & freeze dried foods.....I am not presently looking to change but, (like others), I keep an open mind & am interested in what else is disussions re differrent foods.

I had never heard of the USA food named Honest Kitchen. I am sure it is cheaper stateside, albeit Amazon UK will ship this to UK for a price that equates to £223.30 for 10kg !  Interestingly this product is marketed as dehydrated, (not air dried) dog food.......from what I  can see it is raw food that has been dried......they also seem to do it with added moisture in tins and pouches.

A bit confused to see mention of Hermann's dog food here as it is wet complete (not air or freeze dried).

For info of anyone else viewing this thread (if less familar re these foods) ......air and freezed dried dog foods are essentially what ammount to dried raw complete products.

Apologies if inference taken that I wanted to switch or if I have misinterpreted something.



Oops sorry Coaster. I was reading Chris' post and for some reason I must have misread it. Thought there was a search for new high quality food that is less expensive than ZiwiPeak or Orijen. Looking back I can see that it was about why ZiwiPeak was chosen. My bet.

12
I don't know if you can get it in the U.K. or something similar, but have you heard of the Honest Kitchen?  I know a lot of people who feed it (in the States) as they do not have time for Raw, or a similar product. It is really high quality and price is okay too.

If you are interested in trying another wet food. Use zooplus.co.uk and try "Herrmanns". It is a German brand, organic, and decently priced. It was the cheapest after Wainwrights for my dog (20kg) on a daily basis (if Id go by their feeding amounts which I do not as my dog struggles with not enough weight). They have great customer service (I emailed directly with the boss of the company) and zooplus has equal good service. Only thing I do not like is that they do not provide percentages of ingredients (only how much meat and how much of the other stuff e.g. 50% duck, 50% sweetpotato, squash and evening primrose oil) and they will not give it to you if you ask either. However, generally the food is such a high quality that I do not mind that much (honestly, opening the can the only thing that throws me off is the consistency, otherwise I would pretty much eat it...)


13
The price probably comes from them being imported. Ziwi Peak is from Australia I think and I know Orijen is from the States. They are both really high quality foods and both were recommended to me by a food nutritionist before and I know several people (more with Orijen) that have great experience with them. However, they are not that pricy if you live in the U.S. although still higher priced. Apparently Fromm is of similar quality so I know many who feed that as it's cheaper a bit. But again, in the U.S.

14
You're welcome. I had to cave this winter and get my border collie a sweater and raincoat. He was NEVER cold before, not even in way below 0 temperatures, but he had some health issues in autumn which led to weight loss and I think he never put on a proper coat either because of what he was dealing with. He stopped enjoying his walks and was shivering all the time, so I thought wth, rather dress my dog then have a bouncy ball inside all the time  ;D

I had to have my mom's friend knit one though as the store ones just wouldn't fit him as he is not only very slender but also because of his built (more like a greyhound almost) and most sweaters were like a straight tube which would hang down on him (and ergo he'd pee in it...gross)

15
It may help to get him a longer sweater, probably have to knit it yourself. And definitely a coat for outside when it's raining/cold.

Not usually a fan if there is no reason, but I think it may help him.

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