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Garlic in dog food

Garlic

As many dog owners know, very large doses of garlic can be dangerous for dogs - a fact that has led to garlic being omitted from most dogs' diets for decades, but what most dog owners don't know is that small amounts of garlic can actually be extremely beneficial.

Basically, garlic helps to keep your dog free from all sorts of nasties: it is an effective anti-fungal and anti-bacterial, it helps to eliminate intestinal worms and it acts as a deterrant to skin parasites like ticks. For these reasons, garlic can be a real help for dogs with all sorts of ailments and infections caused by bacterial, fungal or parasitic infection. And it's benefits don't stop there. Garlic has been linked with lowering blood sugar in diabetics, to aiding joint mobility and even to lowering blood cholesterol!

Some dog foods are now starting to include garlic in their recipes but if you would like to add your own, roughly one clove per 10kg of body weight per day is a good place to start. Toxic doses really have to be quite huge (as much as two whole bulbs per day for an extended period) so don't be too concerned about over feeding garlic.

Find foods containing Garlic See the full Ingredient Glossary

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Cory Eckert 2 years ago

Garlic in any form is not okay. I keep my golden retriever away from garlic as far as possible. Here are the side effects which have been backed up by specialists: https://goldenretrieverlove.... I guess it really depends on the owner. For me, my pups aren't getting any of that stuff.

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Beki88 7 years ago

Hey, just wondered if garlic capsules are ok? My lab for some reason won't touch real garlic but happily pinches my garlic capsules. If so how many mg would you recommend? She is 25kg and almost 2 years old. Love the site, really informative although the only food our baby eats without it making her ill is rated badly which makes me feel awful but it's catch 22 in that situation. Thanks

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Ponkbutler 8 years ago

My vet told me the toxin in garlic (and onion, where it is much stronger) will build up in a dog's body over time, so small amounts regularly are not advised.

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All About Dog Food Ponkbutler 8 years ago

Hi Ponkbutler. Your vet is absolutely right that thiosulphate (contained in both onions and garlic) can build up over time and if it reaches significant levels it can be very dangerous indeed. Onions contain fairly large amounts of thiosulphate and should never be fed to dogs. Garlic, on the other hand, contains very small amounts and in order to reach toxic levels, dogs would need to eat a very large amount (as much as two whole bulbs) every day for an extended period. As long as you stick to the above guide, the amount of thiosulphate in your dog's body will never get anywhere near a dangerous level.

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Caroline Chapman All About Dog Food 7 years ago

I give my dog low dose garlic a week on a week off

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Dawn Menzies 8 years ago

Thanks, this is really useful to know as there are a lot of conflicting messages on the internet about whether it is ok or not. We use it in homemade treats and our dog loves it, but as we bake the treats and freeze them it spreads the amount out that he gets over a longer period of time. I was unsure whether it was ok though as some things on the internet suggest you should not give any and it's very harmful to dogs, whereas others say small amounts are ok. To be honest we kept using it as it hasn't seemed to harm our dog at all and I definitely think it helps as a flea repellent.

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