Feeding Dogs with Pancreatitis

August 18, 2020   |   By David Jackson, AllAboutDogFood.co.uk

Feeding dogs with pancreatitis

What is Pancreatitis

The pancreas is an organ that fulfils two very important roles in dogs - firstly, it secretes hormones like insulin and glucagon to help control blood sugar level and, secondly, it produces enzymes to help in the breakdown of carbohydrates, proteins and, especially, fats.

Any time the pancreas becomes inflamed, it is called pancreatitis and when that occurs, the flow of enzymes into the digestive tract can become disrupted, forcing the enzymes out of the pancreas and into the abdominal area. These enzymes can then begin to break down the fat and proteins in the other organs, as well as in the pancreas itself and the results can be very severe.

Acute vs Chronic

Pancreatitis is generally described as being either acute and chronic. Acute pancreatitis is an isolated episode of usually severe pancreatic inflammation while chronic pancreatitis is a longer standing inflammation which can continue for months or even years.

It's important to note, though, that acute and chronic pancreatitis are not mutually exclusive - acute pancreatitis, for example, may lead to chronic pancreatitis and it is possible for dogs with chronic pancreatitis to experience episodes of acute pancreatitis.

Symptoms

Canine pancreatitis symptomsIn both cases, the most common signs of pancreatitis are fever, vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, weight loss, dehydration, lethargy and abdominal pain (especially after eating).

If you suspect your dog is suffering from pancreatitis, it is very important that you first seek the advice of your vet in order to confirm the diagnosis and ensure that all necessary medical steps are taken before moving on to the dietary measures suggested below.

Causes

There are several possible causes of inflammation to the pancreas. High levels of fat in the blood (lipemia) is the most common cause but trauma to the pancreas, hypercalcemia (excessive calcium in the blood), and some drugs and toxins can also result in pancreatitis.

Acute pancreatitis is most common around the christmas break as millions of dogs are treated to large amounts of very fatty leftovers which their bodies simply can't handle.

Although pancreatitis can occur in any dog, it is more common in females than males and older, overweight and relatively inactive dogs are particularly at risk. Some breeds are also more prone to pancreatitis than others with Miniature Schnauzers, Miniature Poodles and Cocker Spaniels having the highest incidence.

Treatment

Whether your dog is suffering from a bout of acute pancreatitis or a long-running chronic episode, your first step should always be to consult your vet. For acute cases, vets will usually withhold food and fluids for a day or two to give the pancreas time to rest and to slow the production of digestive enzymes. Your vet may administer drugs for pain and/or to help ease nausea and vomiting. In some cases, IV fluids may also have to be given.

Once back home, it is important to follow your vet's instructions until your dog is back on his feet.

Following an acute episode, your vet will likely recommend a prescription diet specifically designed for dogs recovering from pancreatitis. Although we at All About Dog Food are not the biggest fans of prescription diets (find out why here), we would recommend sticking with their recommended food at least until the episode has subsided, after which we can start to look at a more nutritious, long term solution.

Don't forget to provide plenty of fresh, clean water to avoid dehydration.

Dietary management and prevention

Getting the diet right is absolutely crucial for both managing chronic pancreatitis and preventing future acute episodes. The primary aim should always be to minimise the workload on the pancreas by only giving it nutrients that it can easily process and avoiding anything that could put it under unnecessary strain.

Please note that these guidelines are meant for adult maintenance only. For puppies, nursing females or for dogs with other concurrent health conditions, it is best to consult your vet.

So what are the options?

Option 1: Prescription diets

There are plenty of prescription diets out there specifically designed to manage pancreatitis and for many dogs they undeniably work well. Most vets will, of course, recommend this option but what they probably won't tell you is that many over-the-counter foods fulfil essentially the same nutritional criteria as the prescription diets and can be used to effectively manage pancreatitis at a fraction of the price.

Option 2: Over-the-counter dog foods

As we mentioned above, the main dietary aim is to make life easy for the pancreas and although the specialist prescription diets can do that admirably, so can many regular pet foods.

Fat

Since one of the pancreas' main roles is the breakdown of fats, the easiest way to reduce its workload is to feed a low fat diet. High quality named animal fats are also better than lower grade vegetable fats or fats from unknown sources.

Digestibility

A food that is easy to digest is good for all dogs but for dogs with pancreatitis, it's really essential. Look for foods with good, bio-appropriate ingredients and try to avoid any of the nasties (the ingredients we highlight in red and yellow) that can put excessive strain on the digestive system.

Protein

The pancreas also helps to digest proteins so you will want to avoid foods with very high protein levels. With protein, though, quality is always much more important than quantity. The best protein for dogs comes from high end, named meat ingredients. If the food contains too many plant protein supplements (like pea protein, maize protein, soya etc) that's generally not a great sign.

Carbs

Less carbs also means less work for the pancreas so avoid foods with high percentages of NFE carbs or too many starchy 'fillers' like white rice, white potato, maize, tapioca, pea starch etc.

Sugar

Added sugars in dog foods are never a good thing but for dog's with pancreatitis they are certainly worth avoiding.

To summarise, you're looking for a food that is...

    Pancreatitis diet checklist

  • Low in fat (between 5% and 10% dry matter)
  • Highly digestible (hypoallergenic & clearly labelled)
  • Moderate protein (between 20% and 30% dry matter)
  • Low to moderate NFE carbs (no more than 60% dry matter)
  • No added sugars
  • Get suitable foods

The button above will take you to a list of foods that tick these boxes but the list is not exhaustive so you may also want to ask your favourite dog food manufacturers if they have something that would also fit the bill.

Canine pancreatitis

Home-prepared food

A suitable home prepared diet, be it cooked or raw, can work wonders for dogs with digestive problems like pancreatitis but careful planning is crucial. The points above are a good place to start but to fully cover recipe formulation for pancreatitic dogs is, frankly, an article in itself which will have to go on to the to-do list for now. In the meantime, though, this page provides a fairly comprehensive guide on the subject.

treats for dogs with pancreatitisTreats, leftovers and tidbits

Be sure to avoid any treats, tidbits and table scraps that are high in fat or of a low quality - the Treat Directory will help you to find suitable alternatives. Make sure other family members and friends are also onboard with this as even a slight indiscretion cold result in another bout of pancreatitis.

It is also important to make sure your bins and pet food storage containers are well and truly dog-proof.

Supplements

Certain supplements may also help reduce the risk of acute pancreatitis or control the effects of chronic pancreatitis. You might be able to find them included in complete foods or you can add them to your dog's diet yourself.

Pancreatic digestive enzyme supplements have been reported to help some dogs with pancreatitis while fish body oils (such as salmon oil or EPA oil but not cod liver oil), can help to lower blood lipid levels which may reduce the workload on the pancreas.

Probiotics and prebiotics can help with digestion and may aid in the management of pancreatitis. The most common prebiotics in pet food include Mannan-oligosaccharides (MOS), fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), inulin and chicory extract.

Changing diets healthily

Whatever food you decide to go with, be sure to introduce it gradually (over the course of at least a week or two) to give the system plenty of time to adjust and to make it easier for you to spot and rectify any potential issues early on. You can find our guide to changing diets here.

Your experiences

If your dog has suffered with pancreatitis, we would love to hear from you either in the comments section below or on The Pancreatitis Thread on the forum. What worked and what didn't? How would you do things differently in the future? Please do let us know as your tips could make all the difference to other dog owners out there.


Comments

90 Comments AADF Privacy Policy Sign in to comment
Hanli Grobler 18 days ago

Why not cod liver oil?

Kevin J. Kennedy a month ago

PUMA 14 yr Bichon has it and I have her (12 lbs) on a white skinless roasted Chicken diet and she is doing better. Is watermelon AOK? plz advise. Thx KeKe

June Gee 2 months ago

Hi, my jack Russell was diagnosed with lymphoma and pancreatitis, I have her on a home cooked diet of chicken breast, sweet potato, green beans and rice, blended, her treats are cooked sweet potato bites home made. She has nothing else in her diet but every now and then the pancreatitis flares up. What else can I do for her, thanks

Gayle lee 4 months ago

So my daughters 110 lb Blue Tick Coonhound was diagnosed with pancritis, today. The vets want her on $100 dog food. She is not rich and can’t afford that so can anyone help us here??
Using lower price brands or home cooking?? I’m praying very hard that some angel can help us
Gayle Lee
gillybird57@gmail.com

Lynn Tearse 5 months ago

I'm posting this again. Please read it if your dog has pancreatitis.Last year I developed acute pancreatitis myself after surgery to remove gallstones. A friend of mine who is a research scientist advised me to drink Diet Coke before every meal because it contains the artificial sweetener aspartame. Phenylalaline is a component of aspartame which causes the pancreas temporarily to shut down enzyme production. Shutting down enzyme production allows the pancreas to rest and recover until the inflammation settles, while you may continue to eat and drink normally. Not only does appetite return, it is stimulated. The effect on me was almost immediate: the nausea and pain disappeared I stopped vomiting and I had a very healthy appetite. I was in hospital at the time, and the drop in pancreatic enzyme production was tracked in my blood tests. I continued with the aspartame for a couple of months until my pancreas healed. When our Westie Heidi developed pancreatitis we consulted with the vet and the Veterinary Poisons Advice Service to check for an y possible adverse effects, and we worked out a safe dose of Canderel for her (1 qtr teaspoon Canderel dissolved in 20ml of water. Administer orally with a syringe before every meal.) It worked its magic on her too. Take care to supplement the dog's diet with pancreatic enzymes (given that you are deliberately shutting the pancreas down). Preferably feed a fresh food diet of low fat protein (chicken, turkey, white fish), leafy greens and legumes, blitzed in the food processor to aid digestion. Once the pancreatitis has settled down, Include a small amount of high quality fat such as fish oil or coconut oil to stimulate the gallbladder. Continue with this regime for 2 months, then wean off gradually. We've talked about this to human and animal doctors but apart from the docs on the ward when I was in hospital who witnessed my transformation, they remain skeptical.

L Smith Lynn Tearse a month ago

What pancreatic enzymes did you give your dog?

Lynn Tearse L Smith a month ago

Lypex capsules

paul snyder Lynn Tearse 4 months ago

Hi Lynn, thanks for your experience. How much does your dog weigh? I have a 90 pound pit/rot mix think I should up the canderel?

Lynn Tearse paul snyder 4 months ago

Hi Paul, our dog is a westie and weighs only 8kg. We gave her a quarter teaspoon of canderel, so, yes, increase accordingly. 8kg is I think just under 18 pounds, so perhaps try multiplying fourfold to one teaspoon initially, and increase to one and a half teaspoons if you need to. You can either sprinkle over food, or, dissolve in water. You don't need to be super accurate about the amount of water. I usually didn't give Heidi all of the solution anyway. However delivering in solution ensures that the pancreas is shut down before your dog begins to eat. Once the pancrease shuts down the effects are obvious: your dog will stop feeling nauseous, and appetite will return. Please do let me know how things go. All the best

Shel Roth 5 months ago

My dog started vomiting while we were getting into a moved(forced out of a rental so house could be sold). I thought it was just nerves, but he kept getting worse. The day after we got into the new place he was consistently vomiting, moaning and shaking, plus he was showing signs of shock(I thought he had been poisoned. Took him to emergency vet, they took him in and administer fluids, and antibiotics. Well, turns out he's allergic to antibiotics, which NO ONE there noticed he was going into Anaphylactic shock. In fact they brought him out to the car, gave me MORE antibiotics to give him and I was told his swollen and googlied eyes, swollen face, his struggles for breath, and the stream of drool was part of the 'pancreatitis'. $1030.oo paid; I got him home and he SUFFERED most of the evening while I got online and did a load of research. I gave him some Benadryl to ease the shock and stayed up with him to make sure he got enough moisture. Next morning called another regular vet and took him in. Explained all that had happened and they took him in and put him AGAIN on fluids and AGAIN gave him antibiotics! I was livid when the doctor called me and told me what he had done. I went and got my pup and tried to nicely tell the vet he was hideous. Got Jasper home did a ton more research(5 days worth) as I cooked down chicken thighs for broth, found and bought a pack of herbs and enzymes and tried to force them into him through a feeding syringe. I'm at 7 days without sleep at this point. His swelling went down, his eyes became less conjunctivitis, he started recognizing me again, and even held down the broth. He was still hurting, so a friend suggested CBD for dogs to help calm the pain and let him sleep( he hadn't slept for 7 days either). it helped; he finally fell asleep. He slept most of the day and when he woke up I gave him the herbs and some broth. This continued for the next 5 days. FINALLY he was able to get up and walk about a bit, so I tried feeding him cooked chicken(carefully trimmed of all fat and ground up), he immediately threw it up! So back to broth. I again got back on the internet to research and came across some studies done in China on dogs with pancreatitis and how a certain blend of herbs stopped the pancreatitis from overreacting and balanced out the effects on the other organs, including the diabetes caused from severe chronic pancreatitis. The study showed the combination worked in settling the pancreatitis and the resulting diabetes and at 12 weeks showed significate improvement and healing of the pancreatitis. So I ordered all the herbs used and started him on a small amount of the tea 3x's a day 1.4 ounces each time. Plus continued the herbs and enzymes just before feeding. I also put him on a raw diet. In 3 days he was jumping about and back to his brat self. So you know, he's an Australian Shepherd-St. Bernard mix, he weighed 130 pounds(he was overweight) when this all started, he now weighs 93 pounds. He's had a couple more bouts of the pancreatitis thanks to a roommate giving him fatty foods, but after a major discussion with said roommate Jasper is back up and doing very well. I have to be extremely careful of what he eats, but he's in much better condition now. This began in February 2021.

Cheryl Martindale Shel Roth 4 months ago

Could you tell me what kind of herbs you used my Yorker has had pancreatitis for about 5 years I feed her a homemade diet but she still occasionally has an attack.

Shel Roth Cheryl Martindale 4 months ago

Hi Cheryl- The basic mix I give him is Pancreatic glandular(as the digestive aid, Bilberry (which regulates the interaction of the pancreas-spleen-liver-and gall bladder), Dandelion root( which helps release insulin), Burdock root(helps level and control insulin to balance sugars), Cinnamon(light use- helps with inflammation) and gastric juices), Oregano Oil(fights infection/inflammation), Chinese Skullcap(an anti emetic- stops the vomiting), Milk Thistle( removes toxins- heals liver damage due to insulin and bile imbalances- helps restore natural function to pancreas). There are many more. I also found studies that show Melatonin/L-Tryptophan actually heal pancreatic cells and restore function. I'm still learning- all I have done is based on research and experimentation. My pup is allergic to antibiotics, so that has added more dimensional exacerbation to my attempts to help him.
There are several formulas I mix and adjust depending on what is happening each day. If links are allowed I will share some information resources I have found. https://www.herbal-suppleme...
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.go...
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih...
https://laboklin.com/enint/...
Not sure how much this helps. Just a word of warning to read up on all herbs and how much to give due to some being toxic in too much/too often use(to be used minutely or temporary). If you have more questions I will try to help. Presently it is late and I haven't gotten much sleep in the last few month in attending to my pup's situation & other life circumstances, plus doing research...
Jasper is acutely reactive to even minute amounts of fat, so feeding him has been based on an enzyme mix given 5 minutes before he eats his meat mix of trimmed and finely cut chicken, elk, and turkey and some sweet potato/green beans/kale pureed and mixed into his meat. He cannot tolerate lentils, beans, white potatoes, wheat or even oats. It's been harsh time trying to find what works for him. I even give him a CBD blended with L-Tryptophan and ginger to help with pain, stress, and appetite. Wish you the best with your babe.

Mindy 5 months ago

My fur baby has been in the hospital for 2 days now (2 year old French Bulldog), she started vomiting and was throwing up everything she ate. Long story short, vet is now treating her for pancreatitis. I am beyond a mess, this is my baby and I’m scared to death for her. How long can I expect her to stay and be treated? Will she be ok? I’m just sick! Any advice is very much appreciated.

Lori Mindy 5 months ago

I had same problem
Started my dog on Raw Pancreas
And raw diet
Call me and I will share
Very lengthy..
Just started in March
Have had great results..🙏🙏
714-803-7804
Lori..

Sheila 5 months ago

Great ARticle!!
My doggie has had it twice and is better now. One thing I did learn was. Check your environment for the pesticides and other toxic chemicals. if they are on your dogs feet after walk. wash your dogs feet. Those chemicals can aid in pancreatitis.

pauline hubman 6 months ago

MY PENNY HAS PANCREATISIS SINCE LAST MONTH, I FED HER RICE AND BOILED BEEF, AND MY VET RECCOMENDED PERCRIPTION DOG FOOD, AND SHE CANT HANDLE IT,, SHE STOPPED VOMITING AND BOWELS ARE BETTER NOW, SHE STOPPED EATING GRASS, AND I WANT MORE FOR HER AND WAS READING DIANA CHAMBERLAIN COMMENTS AND WILL TRY MORE OF VEGGIES , AND CHICKEN AND SALMON, AND THE YEAST, THANK YOU DIANA CHAMBERLOAIN.. IT GIVES ME A START.

pauline hubman 6 months ago

my furbaBY DEVELOPED PANCREATITIS THIS PAST MONTH, I GOTTEN A LOW FAT PERCRIPTION DOG FOOD, AND IT DIDNT AGREE WITH HER, I HAVE HER ON RICE AND BOILED BEEF, JUST BEEN READING DIANA CHAMBERLAIN COMMENTS OF FEEDING HER DOG, THANKS FOR YOUR INPUT ON YOUR DOG. DIANA. MY BABY IS 13 YRS OLD..

Diana Chamberlain 7 months ago

My Beagle developed Pancreatitis over Christmas. It appears to have been caused by too much peanut butter. He gave me such a fright. He was definitely overweight. Since the illness I have cut out all excess fat and have been preparing him fresh vegetables, butternut squash, peas, carrots, broccoli etc and mixing it with whole grain bulgar wheat. I add a vegan product called nutritional yeast which has protein, fibre and B vitamins. I also add taurine and some lentils from time to time. Since he’s on this strict diet he has lost almost all excess weight, his bowels are regular and his coat is shining and soft. He’s 12 with plenty of energy and a great appetite. He used to eat grass and vomit regularly before I started feeding him like this. He never eats grass anymore and hasn’t been sick once. He doesn’t have gas and seems really happy. Treats are strictly grated organic carrots and chopped cucumber and fresh salad greens.

Judy Diana Chamberlain 4 months ago

Hi Diana
Just wondering about the yeast. I’ve recently read that yeast isn’t good for dogs. I’ve never heard of nutritional yeast and I’m wondering if it’s ok for dogs and what the difference is between normal and nutritional yeast?
My dog has pancreatitis. I make up similar to you, no meats, all veg and egg whites which has always made him better. Every time he slowly goes back to meat he gets sick again so I stick to the veg recipe for him.

Lynn Tearse 8 months ago

Last year I developed acute pancreatitis myself after surgery to remove gallstones. A friend of mine who is a research scientist advised me to drink Diet Coke before every meal because it contains the artificial sweetener aspartame. Phenylalaline is a component of aspartame which causes the pancreas temporarily to shut down enzyme production. Shutting down enzyme production allows the pancreas to rest and recover until the inflammation settles, while you may continue to eat and drink normally. Not only does appetite return, it is stimulated. The effect on me was almost immediate: the nausea and pain disappeared I stopped vomiting and I had a very healthy appetite. I was in hospital at the time, and the drop in pancreatic enzyme production was tracked in my blood tests. I continued with the aspartame for a couple of months until my pancreas healed. When our Westie Heidi developed pancreatitis we consulted with the vet and the Veterinary Poisons Advice Service to check for an y possible adverse effects, and we worked out a safe dose of Canderel for her (1 qtr teaspoon Canderel dissolved in 20ml of water. Administer orally with a syringe before every meal.) It worked its magic on her too. Take care to supplement the dog's diet with pancreatic enzymes (given that you are deliberately shutting the pancreas down). Preferably feed a fresh food diet of low fat protein (chicken, turkey, white fish), leafy greens and legumes, blitzed in the food processor to aid digestion. Include a small amount of high quality fat such as fish oil or coconut oil to stimulate the gallbladder. We've talked about this to human and animal doctors but apart from the docs on the ward when I was in hospital who witnessed my transformation, they remain skeptical. There are scientific studies which describe this effect of phenylalaline, so the evidence is there.

Lynn Tearse Lynn Tearse 8 months ago

I posted this a couple of years ago. Our westie Heidi is still fit and well.

Glenna Lynn Tearse 5 months ago

Hi Lynn, I am going to try my dog on the aspartame for his chronic pancreatitis. He has improved with enzymes so I will continue those also like you said. He doesn’t always eat his food right away so I heard you mention sprinkling it on the food. I was wondering if you feel like that would give it time to be absorbed before the food is affected by the pancreas? Or if I gave it before eating how long does it keep the pancreas “shutdown”? Thank you for your help.

Judy Flowers 10 months ago

Our. “Baby” dog has pancreatitis. She was diagnosed with it about a year and 1/2 ago. She’s been doing very well, but last week, it hit her pretty hard. Her kidney functions were high, 95, and the next day her doctor got them down to 60, which I know they like for them to be around 30. We brought her home today, and I’m trying to get her to eat, as she hasn’t eat in several days. She drinks a ton of water, and has since we got her home. I’ve gave her the hills kidney care wet food, her Fresh Pet in beef, instead of her chicken, boiled her some chicken, and she still won’t eat. I’m wondering if there is ANYTHING that I could maybe sprinkle on her food to draw her closer to at least, smell it !!!??? She is shaking a lot, but I think that may be some of the steroids her vet gave her. Over the last 5 days that she was there, she got a lot. It’s killing me, NOT seeing her eat. Any suggestions???!!!!!

jane Judy Flowers 8 months ago

So sorry for your dog I hope she started eating however when my dogs gets that way I force feed her a bite or two which gets her to start eating on her own

Lyn Harvey Judy Flowers 8 months ago

I've been boling 5% fat turkey mince along with boiled brown rice, both dogs wolf it down, the older of which suffers from pancreas issues. Make sure the rice is boiled so its very soft

Will2030 a year ago

Thank you for hte article! It's really good

Philippa Adshead a year ago

I rescued a 8 year Cavelier King Charles spaniel 2 years ago. He had a malignant tumour removed and now has terminal adrenal cancer. He had an operation to remove it last July but the operation was abandoned because his blood pressure went sky high so he is now on Phenoxybenzamine. In March he developed congenital heart failure so he is also on 40mg Furosemide twice daily.
3 months ago is started with diarrhoea so the vet put him on Royal Canine gastrointestinal food. After many visits the vet finally took blood and poo samples. Alfie has now been diagnosed with Chroic Pancreatitis, campylobacter and cryptspiridium for which he has been prescribed the antibiotic Erythromycin. I am following vet advice and feeding him Royal Canin low fat gastrointestinal canned food which he ate with gusto at first. However he is now refusing to eat it and hasn't had a proper feed since Sunday. I am at my wits end and ould welcome any advice about I can feed him which wont affect his Pancreatitis.
Thank you

Cathy Fitzpatrick 2 years ago

Thank you just waiting on Blood results taken today
Bria is a field Labrador aged 10 and half years old ( birthday in October )
she has had Gastro, (*Gastro Enteritis* 2 weeks ago,) Colitis, in the past Vets are now re checking again for any other symptoms. Great information for dog lovers....

Lynn Tearse 2 years ago

Last year I developed acute pancreatitis myself after surgery to remove gallstones. A friend of mine who is a research scientist advised me to drink Diet Coke before every meal because it contains the artificial sweetener aspartame. Phenylalaline is a component of aspartame which causes the pancreas temporarily to shut down enzyme production. Shutting down enzyme production allows the pancreas to rest and recover until the inflammation settles, while you may continue to eat and drink normally. Not only does appetite return, it is stimulated. The effect on me was almost immediate: the nausea and pain disappeared I stopped vomiting and I had a very healthy appetite. I was in hospital at the time, and the drop in pancreatic enzyme production was tracked in my blood tests. I continued with the aspartame for a couple of months until my pancreas healed. When our Westie Heidi developed pancreatitis we consulted with the vet and the Veterinary Poisons Advice Service to check for any possible adverse effects, and we worked out a safe dose of Canderel for her (1 qtr teaspoon Canderel dissolved in 20ml of water. Administer orally with a syringe before every meal.) It worked its magic on her too. Take care to supplement the dog's diet with pancreatic enzymes (given that you are deliberately shutting the pancreas down). Preferably feed a fresh food diet of low fat protein (chicken, turkey, white fish), leafy greens and legumes, blitzed in the food processor to aid digestion. Include a small amount of high quality fat such as fish oil or coconut oil to stimulate the gallbladder. We've talked about this to human and animal doctors but apart from the docs on the ward when I was in hospital who witnessed my transformation, they remain skeptical. There are scientific studies which describe this effect of phenylalaline, so the evidence is there.

Chinmayi Mehta Lynn Tearse 8 months ago

Hi Lynn, I just read your account of how you treated your dog with pancreatitis with Canderel (aspartame). I live in India, and have a senior dog (30 kgs or 66 lbs) who suffered from acute pancreatitis 2 weeks ago. She was on the drip every day for 8 days. Then we started her on prescription GI food (increased incrementally every day). After 4 days of eating well, she suddenly relapsed yesterday and we've had to begin the IV drip again. I am now concerned that once we re-start her on food, she should not get another relapse. Is there any more information you can give me on how you went about it? We don't get Canderel in India, but we get Equal which also has aspartame. You have mentioned that you gave 1/4 of a teaspoon to your Westie; however my dog is about 3 times the weight of a Westie. So how did you go about working on the dosage? Any info that you can give me on this would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Lynn Tearse Chinmayi Mehta 8 months ago

Hi ChinmayiAn adult person takes 1-2 teaspoons of canderel with a cup of tea or coffee, and this amount is more than enough to shut down the pancreas. We gave Heidi one eighth of this amount. I would try your dog with a half teaspoon sprinkled over food if appetite is ok. If not eating, dissolve in 20ml of water and administer with an oral syringe. Feed your dog two small meals of very low fat eg boiled chicken per day. Gradually introduce small amounts of fat such as coconut oil after a couple of weeks if she is responding well. Continue the sweetener for at least two months. Don't be tempted to stop the sweetener too soon even if all symptoms of pancreatitis have gone. The pancreas takes a long time to heal. Buy a pancreatic enzyme supplement as soon as you can, to support nutrition until you stop the sweetener. It's probably a good idea to continue with the enzymes even after stopping the sweetener, to continue to support digestion, especially given that your dog is senior.Let me know how it goesVery best wishesLynn

Sarah Black 2 years ago

My dog a miniature Poodle was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis in Spain a week ago. Amazing service. Saw his own vet immediately on return home.They decided not to treat him but carry on with his non fat diet. I am feeding him Hills prescription digestive and also chicken with rice and sweet potato.
I just have no idea how much he should be eating? Originally it was a can of dried food over six meals per day. He is much better and have him down to slightly larger portions 4 meals daily. What weight of food should he have daily?

Jo P 3 years ago

Hi, I have a 5 year old male cocker spaniel who was diagnosed with pancreatitis earlier this month. Not sure what caused it as he was on a raw diet (which was very low fat) never scavenged and was a fit and healthy dog. Not overweight and weighing 11.5kg so just under what a cocker should be, but he’s so active he never sits still.
After diagnosis one of the vets didn’t recommend that I give raw food (I won’t go into that argument) and suggested Chappie instead. I have worried myself that I may have introduced something in his raw diet that caused this and so am very wary about going back onto raw & have gone with the vets advice to get him back on track.
He’s not had another attack (touch wood) and I have been feeding him 3-4 times a day a tin and a half of chappie. He has carrots, fish sticks or cooked chicken as a treat (mainly if I go out and leave him - was always a raw treat before) but am Conscious that he has to have low fat now. When he came
Out of the vets after stopping in & being on fluids he had understandably lost weight and weighed 11.1kg.
I have been back today as I’m so worried about him as he is losing more weight and is skin and bone. It actually looks like I’m starving him. He was weighed and is now 10.8kg. The
Vet didn’t seem overly concerned however it can’t be right that he is this thin. Any recommendations for a food that I can give him that would also put some weight on (just to get him back to where he was before all this and so he doesn’t feel like he will break) would be appreciated. I must add he is happy in himself and wagging his tail like a crazy cocker and doesn’t seem down or depressed or anything like that. So food suggestions are welcome.
Thanks

Nancy Jo P 5 months ago

Hi, Our vet, too, advised Chappie and so far our 3 year old miniature labradoodle is recovering well from pancreatitis. It's cheap and, most importantly, does the job so we will be sticking to that. Many years ago I had a golden retriever who, due to a genetic condition, had to have an enzyme supplement and was also prescribed Chappie. This combination also managed her condition. It's been recommended by vets for years and, in my experience, for good reason. If it ain't broke... Good luck!

Sola Scriptura 3 years ago

THE BACKSTORY: My 13-year old dog -- a 35 lb. Jack Russell and Beagle mix ("Jack-A-Bee") had pancreatitis two years ago when I ran out of his home-cooked boiled white chicken meat that I've always made him, exclusively. In a pinch, fed him leftover pot roast with too much of the gravy. He had a bad bout of vomiting, but quickly recovered after being administered antibiotics and IV hydration. From then on, he was vulnerable to a relapse so I made sure to never give him anything too fatty. He got a lot of treats (Pupperoni and Milk Bone) and a few scraps here and there, as well as yogurt on occasion. Then, in November, he had ended up with advanced, undetected pancreatitis that became so infected that the infection broke off from the site and traveled to his brain, causing a stroke. He lost control of his body, spun around a few times, vomited, and was in shock. He had "doll eyes". Long story short, the vet put him on antibiotics, hydrated him, and gave him anti-nausea meds, including antacid. He bounced back in two days by and large, but it took a good month before he could come down the staircase, so we had it blocked for weeks. He had a noticeable head tilt for a few months that I do not notice any longer. But, as strong as he is he is a bit unstable. His entire life I gave him boiled plain white chicken.THE DIET CHANGE: Now I cook low-fat Ground Turkey for one hour in some water. Before serving, I strain it in a small plastic strainer with very hot tap water until it is very dry. I then mix it with freshly cooked sweet potato and cooked oatmeal. I nuke both. I used to feed him only at night. Now I break it up between a late-morning breakfast and early evening dinner. He loves it and is doing well. I do not give him snacks any longer. I was eating an orange the other day and he really wanted it, so I have him one sliver of a clementine (after Googling it and getting the okay). Well, at 5:30 am he vomited violently, spun around a few times (as if he was chasing his tail) and collapsed into the furniture. I thought he was having another stroke. I noticed that the vomit has a lot of orange ;pulp in it and that the vomit was very acidic. He was miserable and heaving. I gave him an ant acid that I had left over from November (Fomodidine - which is for humans and is not FDA approved, but vets prescribe it anyway). He was 100% better in ten minutes and went straight to sleep. That was almost 3 days ago and he is completely fine. I ran to Target to pick up more Fomodidine (10 mg. - $4) just to have on hand. I called the vet first and the tech said it was safe to give him.I feel bad that he missed getting snacks, but I need to speak to the vet to get some ideas. I also do not want to get him wanting snacks all the time. His weight is good, but he's not extremely active, so I do not want him to put weight on. I'm just glad that he is fine now. He has an amazing ability to recover quickly, which tells me that he is very healthy aside from his pancreatitis flair ups that I hope will never happen again.Good luck everyone with your sweeties!

Kate Plumb 3 years ago

I have a 3 1/2 year old sprocker who as we speak is at the vets on various iv meds to try and get under control the pancreatitis. I am sure now he has had a few minor flair ups previously but we managed to control with pain killers and swapping normal food for chicken and rice. I am really concerned as he is so young that this condition will just get worse and worse. Any advise or anyone with a young dog being affected? Thank you.

Kathy Mcbride 3 years ago

Please help my 13 year old dog has been diagnosed with pancreatis. Not typical presentation but has been treated with iv antibiotics, iv fluids iv anti emetics, enzymes + an anti acid. We are home to see if we can try + get him to eat. He is skeletal, very lethargic + just wanders around. Vet's said if no better by tomorrow it might be kinder to put him to sleep. I am heart broken. We have tried all kinds of food but refuses. Has anyone any ideas. I'm just heart broken. Heard that baby food rub into his lips might help xx

Julie Johnson Kathy Mcbride 3 years ago

Hi, my girl was diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis at aged 10. She was off her food, but my vet explained that the condition is extremely painful for them when they are having a flair up! As soon as I see signs of her air gulping or lip licking, then I have been told to give her tramadol. I have had to do this on 3 occasions and each time I find if I rub her tummy until the tablets kick in then it all helps! Once the pain meds have done their thing she is much brighter and will then happily eat. She has been fed Burns all her life, but was trained in obedience with cheese, sausage and other high fat meats. I believe its the Burns diet that has prevented her from having an acute attack thankfully!

Janine Hatcher 3 years ago

Hi All. I have a 12 year old Chocolate Labrador who has been diagnosed recently (last week) with pancreatitis. The vet has given me the prescription diet food but she wont eat this so I changed her over to chappie (wet) and she was fine for a few days. Now she is not really eating anything, have even tried rice and chicken. I went back to the vets yesterday and he didn't seem too bothered about lack of eating and has made me another appointment for a weeks time. I am personally really worried as all Labs owners will know they are usually not fussy and will eat anything. Along with lack of food, she is tired all the time and refuses to take her medication. Any advice would be appreciated

Kathy Mcbride Janine Hatcher 3 years ago

How is your wee dog. Did you get him to eat x

Susan Molyneux Janine Hatcher 3 years ago

Hi my 12yr old male staffie is suffering with pancreatitis at present. Not very nice at all as you know. He's been on drips at vets over 4 days and home at nights. On pain relief anti sickness and antibiotics. Sickness has stopped thank goodness. sleeping lots but I've managed to get him eating again. Bone broth homemade with oxtail (every bit of fat removed) with veg. Let it cool and hopefully your dog will lap it up has mine does. No more tinned foods for us. Good luck. Hope this helps a little. Also use chicken for bone broth. He as white fish too. 3 small meals a day. He's so much more lively now

Clare Boitelle 3 years ago

Help. My Bedlington Terrier Iris had an acute pancreanitis and has made a good recovery on homecooked smaller frequent meals. I think she's ready to go back to her usual food but I'm really anxious. She has Forthglade meals and I'll be giving her the lowest fat one ie chicken or turkey around 7% Fat. Do you think there are better choices. She won't eat kibble.

Sabina Clare Boitelle 3 years ago

Hi Clare, my dog is 3 now and diagnosed with pancreatitis last year. Interestingly enough she was also on Forthglade at the time. Having looked into it more I discovered that the levels of fat and protein are too great for smaller dogs despite their feeding guidelines. I now home cook her food. So she’ll either have boiled chicken breast, white fish or turkey breast (better than brown meat) with swede/greens. She has a small handful of her Hills I/D prescription biscuits before bed. I learnt it’s good not to keep their bellies too empty for too long (little and often). She also has a tablespoon of goat natural yoghurt every day before bed and during the day. So far, fingers crossed so good. I’m still convince the Forthglade tipped her over the edge but as a dog parent it’s hard to know that the ingredients are actually accurate and sure that like us, all dogs are different and react to ingredients differently. I hope you’ve found something that works for your little girl :)

Samlilo 3 years ago

Hello, I am new in this web site, I want to share my experience. I own a frenchie, she’s now 14th and she soffred from chronic pancreatitis since two years now. I change her the food and she have no problems since. I leave in France and I find , only at the vet, this food brand: Hills prescription diet- digestive care, i/d low fat.
They have dry treats and can of meat, I give her twice a day , but the second time I don’t add the meat. She don’t vomite anymore ans she are in good healt and shape. I don’t know, but I think this brand can be easily find in internet. Its a little bit expensive ; at my vet 12kg cost me 81€ , but my little furry princess she’s ok now, and that what matter to me.

lady4donna Samlilo 3 years ago

I have a 16 year old miniature poodle. They are prone to getting pancreatitis. She had her 1st bout when 9 years old. She is on the Hills prescription - I/D low fat (chicken & stew wet food) and low fat kibbles (dry food) for older dogs. As long as I refrain from giving her any fatty foods - she stays in remission.

Rebecca Taylor 4 years ago

My poor dog has suffered this condition in the last 24 hours as a result of having been on prescribed veterinary diet for too long. She's had chronic psoriasis and was therefore put on a diet to help that but it is so high in fats that she now has pancreatic problems. I'd like to know if there is a wheat free food that is good for both conditions.

Suzanne Cardiff 4 years ago

My senior boy was just diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis after a year of episodes and no answers. He is vegetarian and now on a homemade diet. (The dry kibble was too hard to digest and now his teeth are ruined from vomiting over the past year) the no/low fat diet is a challenge. I'm trying to learn about foods and what to offer him. Sweet potatoes and green beans seem to really agree with him. I'm working on the protein. Beans seem to be a challenge to process for him in the past. We might try lentils next. Egg whites have gone over well. Starting to notice a trend of processed foods being the worst triggers.
He has to be constantly watched. One stolen mouthful of cat food and he crashes. Hopefully I can get him on track so he can enjoy his senior years again and get back to being active.

Mel Stepney Suzanne Cardiff 3 years ago

Why is he vegetarian? Is there a medical reason as dogs are meant to be carnivores.

Suzanne Cardiff Mel Stepney 3 years ago

That's not true. They are omnivores. There's are so many dogs in the world thriving on veg (vegetarian or vegan) diets. He does very well. Both my dogs do. And it's probably what has saved him. This was written a while back. Since then we've consulted with a pet nutritionist and balanced his diet with supplements bc he can not eat any fats.
Also discovered the f
Digestive enzymes he was in was slowly killing him. He's doing great since stopping them. 😁

Janet Alston 4 years ago

Ozzy had it once after having some left over brisket one Sunday. It was too greasy for him. Vet have him an injection and advised Gaviscon until he was better! I am now very careful what I give him!

lovebobbi 4 years ago

what about just feeding meat? Liver, Chicken, beef, etc? Is that healthy? What if I add coconut oil and salmon oil. Should I still add sweet potatos, pumpkin and some veggies?

Vicki Wolf 4 years ago

We have seen a marked improvement in customer's dogs with pancreatitis on Gentle, and it now comes in a small bite formula. Ring them for a sample or try your local independent pet shop.

Frankthe Cat 4 years ago

some of the basic information written by the author is plain wrong. don't trust what is written here

Jay Bow Frankthe Cat 4 years ago

Frankie, I wholeheartedly disagree with you. Everything I read here is what my Vet has told me.
My 13 yo Jack Russell is now recovering from a severe bout of pancreatitis. I still don't know what caused it as I don't feed any table scraps. My Vet had me withhold food for about 30 hours, she was/still is getting fluids daily, and is being weened back on food by way of chicken breast and rice with Science Diet ID Digestive Care canned food smooshed with water to make a gravy. She is also on Cerenia for vomiting, Famotidine to block stomach acid, Sucralfate for intestinal bleeding, Metronidazole an antibiotic, and Pro-pectalin Tabs for diarrhea. It's been a week since her symptoms began. At one point, I was ready to stop her suffering as she was truly in a lot of pain. My Vet asked me to wait one day, and I'm really glad I did. My dog is certainly much better, but not out of the woods yet. I came to this forum in my research for a good quality food that I can mix with a homemade diet. Anyone with a brain can read this forum and get good info. It's up to them to do the research, talk to their vet before coming to final conclusions. At least this forum is a good place to start and read what others have found in their experiences.

lovebobbi Frankthe Cat 4 years ago

Why would you just say they are wrong without following up on what they are wrong about and correcting them for ALL the people you are aiming at when you warn us they are "plain wrong"? That does me and all the other readers absolutely ZERO good.

Frankthe Cat lovebobbi 4 years ago

as with most of this site there is no science behind most of it, at least not real science, and encouraging people to withhold food is merely the worst of the culprits in this article. the amount of potentially dangerous advice in each article and the extra information which can be read the wrong way is extensive. the entire site seems written by somebody with a soapbox to stand on.

All About Dog Food Frankthe Cat 4 years ago

Hi Frankthe Cat and thanks for posting. We're always looking for ways to improve so if you highlight what you are unhappy with, I will gladly look into it. Feel free to email me directly at info@allaboutdogfood.co.uk

Barbara Walker 4 years ago

My Lhasa Apso has had all the blood work and scans and investigations done which confirms pancreatitis. Our vet has recommended James Wellbeloved Turkey and rice kibble complete with some of the same wet food mixed. Our dog hates it and sneakes the cat kibble Purina One if you are not quick enough. Can you suggest a suitable food to try him on and whether there are any samples available. I have spent ££ on the recommend food which I will donate to a dog charity. Help, my dog is so fussy and it's worrying me that he is not liking the recommended food. We have persevered with him for nearly three weeks now. I have even tried spoon feeding him the wet product with little success.

kate Barbara Walker 4 years ago

My rescue springer has chronic pancreatitis and used to have flare ups regularly. I tried the prescription foods but he hated them and would steal the cats' food. A friend recommended Tails.com and I have to say this has changed his life. He still has has one attack in six months - at one point we were at the vets every 3-4 weeks and is much happier in himself. His coat has also improved dramatically. I had tried all sorts of diets including raw food, BARF and prescription diets but the food from Tails.com is the only one I've found that works.

webfoot Barbara Walker 4 years ago

Hi Barbara
Please make sure you convert the wet food to dry weight matter first as most 'lower fat' tins actually work out at around 18% fat. My boy loves Denes light tins which I thought were 4% fat but actually it turns out they are equivalent to a whopping 18.1%. I'm having to stick to Applaws tins which are 1.7% fat and natures menu frozen fruit and vegetable nuggets mixed in 1.3% fat. Check the actual fat contents of the tins on this site, it states the actual fat content. Fat content for pancreatitis should be as low as possible. Some vets state 3%!! I try for 5%. This can go up when your baby has recovered. Hope this helps.

Ruth Barbara Walker 4 years ago

My girl has had pancreatitis for years, and there are quite a few commercial foods that I've found low enough in fat, the best ones being Wainwrights light kibble (from Pets at Home) which is fishy flavour, Chappie complete dry (chicken or beef, but big biscuits), and just about any Burns kibble (££!) - all less than 10% fat. In terms of meat she can have just about any Butchers/Chappie/Winalot as most are only 5ish% fat content. May be worth asking your vet first just in case there was a specific reason he/she suggested JWB.

Barbara Walker Ruth 4 years ago

Thank you. I have a sample of Gentle dog kibble coming for him to try but if he doesn't like that I will give your suggestions a try. Many thanks for you help.

Tiddy Hamilton 5 years ago

my 8 moth old spaniel has high blood sugar levels after being spayed , could be diabetes , can anyone reccomend a good food for her ,she is loosing weight , most dogs with diadetes are older and over weight,??

LocalNumberFife Tiddy Hamilton 5 years ago

Firstly - check with your VET to ensure that it's not a disease or condition....Try Gentle Dog Food http://www.allaboutdogfood.....
I sell it, I use it, I recommend it. As the name suggests - it's designed to be 'gentle' on the stomach, but unlike many of the 'vet specials' - it still has all the vital nutrients for doggy health. If you do try it - then do NOT overfeed. Weigh the food carefully based on the 'ideal' weight for your dog. If you have any problems then please contact Gentle dog food for a personal reply. www.gentledogfood.co.uk info@gentledogfood.co.ukAlso avoid feeding 'human food' and cheap dodgy treats.

J Oliver 5 years ago

Great to see Country Kibble Grain Free Senior being suitable, lots of my friends dogs have this issue, at least if I do I can stick with the food my dog likes!

Advertisment

Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Site map | Contact Us

Copyright © 2021 David Jackson. All Rights Reserved. Company registered in Finland (why?) #2486782-1